Bhagat Singh: A Saga

By September 28, 2020uncategorized
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Bhagat Singh: A Saga

We at the best school in Jharsuguda, like to shares these stories with our students. Bhagat Singh was a revolutionary who in many terms changed the approach of the youth towards the Indian Independence Struggle.

best school in Jharsuguda

Early Life

Its Bhagat Singh’s birthday today. The legendary revolutionary was born on Sept 28, 1907, in Banga village in Lyallpur, the current Faisalabad district of Pakistan. The Pakistan government has declared his birthplace a national heritage while India’s Punjab state has offered to help set up the site as a world-class memorial.

What happened to Bhagat Singh?

An annual memorial fair is held in Bhagat Singh’s village on March 23, the day he was hanged in Lahore Central Jail with his two comrades — Sukhdev and Rajguru — in 1931, short of his 24th birthday.

At that young age, Bhagat Singh didn’t stay fixed in his beliefs. The voracious reader evolved with new knowledge and newer experiences, and grew as a fearless partisan. He eventually began to rejoice being a self-confessed atheist. It was ironical therefore to see the atheist’s large image — and of his two non-atheist comrades — sketched inside the Babri Masjid.

The Story Continues…

Bhagat Singh’s picture smiled laconically from the southern wall at the rituals taking place 60 years after his death. Under the central dome, a few feet from his portrait, a pujari (Hindu priest) was receiving devotees to worship the image of Lord Ram. A policeman on duty with an archaic 303 rifle was sharing his insights, mouth brimming with tobacco spittle, that Ram was born 900,000 years ago at the spot where the idol now stood.

The thought that revolutionised the Indian Independence struggle

Bhagat Singh and Dutt advocated “radical change”, saying it was necessary “and it is the duty of those who realise it to reorganise society on the socialistic basis”. For this purpose the “establishment of the dictatorship of the proletariat” was necessary.

Bhagat Singh: “Not a just a name, an emotion in the whole”

Indian peasants are restive again, not an unusual event for a largely monsoon-fed economy. Their perennial exploitation and periodic rebellion have been of a piece with Indian history. The Indian government last week passed a bill opening up the agriculture sector, according to prevalent fears, to depredations from big corporates. Given that 86 percent of peasants are small farmers, with five acres or less, the turbulence could be earthshaking. In Punjab, Sikh farmers usually assemble at Shaheed Bhagat Singh Nagar to launch their protest.

Aparnaa World School, the best school in Jharsuguda is truly inspired by his thoughts and ideas.

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